People of colour still aren’t donating their organs – this needs to change | gal-dem

On average, each day, three people die in need of an organ transplant because of a shortage of donors. This shortage is particularly significant for people of colour…   Read article here: People of colour still aren’t donating their organs — this needs to change| gal-dem Advertisements

I’ve Never Been To Notting Hill Carnival But It Still Fills Me With Pride| HuffPost

The annual celebration has its roots in resistance, hope, and celebration; we should do our best for it to stay that way, freelance writer Samara Linton writes. Read article here: I’ve Never Been To Notting Hill Carnival But It Still Fills Me With Pride| HuffPost

The Colour of Madness| Synergi Collaborative Centre

“While we have seen an increase in the attention paid to racial disparities in mental health, for example through news reports, audits and task forces, we are only at the beginning of our journey. The Colour of Madness is but one drop in the ocean of voices that need to be heard.” Read blog post here: […]

“THE FUTURE OF STEM IS FILLED WITH WOMEN WHO LOOK LIKE ME” – #SHAKEUPSTEM| Fawcett Society

The proportion of women working in STEM has been increasing year on year, and this increase is even greater when we look at women from Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds. Read article here: “THE FUTURE OF STEM IS FILLED WITH WOMEN WHO LOOK LIKE ME” – #SHAKEUPSTEM| Fawcett Society

My Label and Me: Being a junior doctor is both exhilarating and tedious, exciting and mundane | Metro

When I tell people I am a junior doctor, I am met by a mixture of admiration and pity. ‘Your parents must be so proud.’ ‘Have you had to give mouth to mouth?’ ‘Do you think I should see my GP about this rash?’ Yes. No. And, probably… Read article here: My Label and Me: […]

The realities of travelling as a black woman | The Skinny

Most of us have a love-hate relationship with Facebook’s “On This Day” feature. Sometimes, the algorithm gets it right and we find ourselves snorting with laughter during an important meeting, at others we are confronted with images of an ex we had hoped to forget. And then there are the holiday memories: clichéd yellow-red sunsets, […]

Motherhood, Migration And Mental Health: Justina Kehinde’s UMUADA | Black Ballad

UMUADA is an exploration of mental health, migration, and motherhood against the backdrop of an urban-African diasporic family. Led by a cast and creative team of Black British women, UMUADA is headlining the 2018 Play Mill Festival at the King’s Head Theatre this July, following its powerful debut at the Bunker Theatre. Black Ballad spoke […]

Meet The Queer Black Women Shaping Today’s Britain| Black Ballad

“My name is Phyll Opoku-Gyimah. I identify as a mother, a black woman, a lesbian, a trade unionist, a lover.” Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, also known as Lady Phyll, is one of the UK’s most prominent black lesbian activists. Lady Phyll is the co-founder and Executive Director of UK Black Pride, a trustee of Stonewall and Head […]

Black Church, White Church: Finding My Home As A Black British Christian | Black Ballad

When I think back to the Sundays of my childhood, I think of the minibus that my dad drove every Sunday. I remember him navigating the hilly roads of the island countryside, picking up smiling, chatty and immaculately dressed passengers along the way. I remember the children bickering in their frilly frocks, wrinkled men in […]

Why We Need To Write Our Own Mental Health Narratives | Black Ballad

It is perhaps unsurprising that in a world where prejudice and discrimination are rampant, merely existing can invoke trauma upon our minds and bodies. I find myself thinking about this a lot, the difficulties of simply existing as who we are. Maybe it was my experience of immigrating from rural Jamaica to inner-city London and […]