As the coronavirus pandemic rages on, a new study has found that Black, Asian and minority ethnic women in the UK are experiencing greater psychological consequences from the pandemic than white women.

Here, Dr Samara Linton, the co-editor of The Colour of Madness, an anthology exploring Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) mental health in the UK, details her own experience, for WH.

Read the article here: ‘Why My Mental Health – as a Black Woman – Is Suffering So Much Right Now | Women’s Health Magazine UK

The Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock has proposed a set of measures to improve the mental health of NHS staff, including a 24-hour advice and support service.

As a junior doctor, I can’t help but wonder if these interventions are merely a plaster on top of a gaping wound.

Read article here: Mental health support for NHS workers is just sticking a plaster on a gaping wound | Metro 

UMUADA is an exploration of mental health, migration, and motherhood against the backdrop of an urban-African diasporic family. Led by a cast and creative team of Black British women, UMUADA is headlining the 2018 Play Mill Festival at the King’s Head Theatre this July, following its powerful debut at the Bunker Theatre. Black Ballad spoke to UMUADA’s award-winning writer and director, Justina Kehinde…

Read article here: Motherhood, Migration And Mental Health: Justina Kehinde’s UMUADA | Black Ballad

It is perhaps unsurprising that in a world where prejudice and discrimination are rampant, merely existing can invoke trauma upon our minds and bodies. I find myself thinking about this a lot, the difficulties of simply existing as who we are.

Maybe it was my experience of immigrating from rural Jamaica to inner-city London and learning that society had already predicted my destination. Or perhaps, it is simply my career in the medical profession, being immersed in a world where vulnerability is the norm, and the impact of trauma is all too evident…

Read article here: Why We Need To Write Our Own Mental Health Narratives| Black Ballad

“but bein alive & bein a woman & bein colored is a metaphysical
dilemma/ i haven’t conquered yet/ do you see the point
my spirit is too ancient to understand the separation of soul & gender”
– 
For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf

A word frequently used to describe women of colour is resilience. In addition to tackling the everyday challenges of health, family, employment and identity, women of colour have to navigate a world with rampant sexism and racism…

Read blog post here: #16blogs for #IDEVAW: Beyond ‘resilience’: black women and mental health

 | Imkaan

“I was 8 when I realised that the brain could go wrong. We were in the middle of class and the girl on the table next to me started shaking. The teacher told us to move the chairs and tables out the way. Her brain just gets too excited sometimes. Epilepsy.”

Read article here: Three Black Women Discuss Their First Time Experiences With Mental Health | Black Ballad